Cruel, cruel world

“Every death is a wakeup call to live more fully, more completely and more presently.” — Oprah

How ironic that I came across this quote today, the same day that I came across this on my patio (Julie A, stop reading now because here comes the icky part; Christy and all my tender-hearted animal-loving friends, I apologize in advance for the graphic nature of this post and the photos:

I consulted the Houston Audubon Society website and it appears to be American Crow. It’s smaller than a Grackle, which are very common around here, especially on the patios of Mexican restaurants where they beg for chips.

Payton and I came home from the gym but didn’t notice the crow on the ground. He went back into the garage to carry in the loot from Academy, and as he walked up to the back door I heard him say, “Ewwww, gross!” I asked what was gross and he said there’s a dead bird on the patio, and before I could get out there, Harry had the bird in his mouth (he is a retriever, after all).

I don’t think Harry killed the bird — he barks a good game, but when push came to shove, I think he’d be too squeamish. He prefers to do his hunting on the kitchen counters when he’s all alone, and no one can see him scarf down a loaf of bread. If Payton and I had happened upon a downed loaf of bread, I would convict Harry in a heartbeat. 

Is this face of a bird killer? I think not.

True, Harry has little patience for birds and barks his fool head off at them. He especially gets rattled by the ones that perch on the peak of our roof. They pause there to rest a minute or sing a little song, and he goes bonkers. If we say “bird” to Harry, he’ll start barking, lifting his two front paws off the ground for emphasis. However, I don’t think he’s a cold-blooded killer.

I think that unfortunate crow hit one of the plate-glass windows that line the family room and overlook the backyard. This has happened once before, and the bird was stunned and knocked for a loop, but eventually recovered enough to fly away and hopefully live a long, happy, song-filled life. That time, I heard the thump of bird body colliding with glass. This time, I did not.

Nevertheless, I left the crow when he was for a while, hoping the fluttering of his tail feathers meant he was coming to and rallying. Alas, it was not to be. There would be no rally for that crow.

Sad, sad, sad.

And also troubling, because with 2 dogs in residence and others who visit regularly, that dead bird could easily become a mess of feathers and innards if left too long. It might also scare the tar out of Pedey the Weasel Dog, who is regularly frightened by his own shadow. If left too long in the intense Houston heat, it would start to stink to high heaven sooner rather than later. And, last but not least, I did not want Macy to see that dead bird. My little zookeeper has a heart as big as Texas, and her love of animals is legendary. In fact, she is at this moment at the Houston Humane Society’s Companion Camp, where she is no doubt loving on every animal in the building.

So how to dispose of the dead bird on my patio? It seemed somehow wrong and not befitting to just pick it up in a plastic bag and dump it in the trash. Wrong and smelly, too, since the trashmen don’t come for another couple of days. I can imagine that a dead bird inside a black trash barrel in the 90+ degree heat would be plenty nasty come trash day. I think the trashmen would have to take the whole barrel.

Enter “The Scoop.”

Anyone who has a dog knows what “The Scoop” is for, and those of you unfortunate souls who don’t have a dog can probably figure it out quite easily. Our Scoop gets plenty of use in our yard, and I’m kinda nutsy about cleaning it real carefully after each use, so I figured this was the best option. 

Poor little crow. He fit quite nicely in “The Scoop” and as much as I tried to avoid looking right at him, I couldn’t help but notice how delicate yet sturdy his feet were. 

He looks like he’s just sleeping in “The Scoop,” right?

The Houston Audubon Society says the American Crow is “highly intelligent” and leads a “complex life.” They hang together, forming large communities, and don’t breed until they are 4 or 5 years old. They have strong family ties and tend to stay together.

Great, I can now picture a crow family worried sick about their relative who hasn’t returned to the nest. They may be doing a fly-over right now, fanning out across the neighborhood searching for their lost guy.

Now I’m really glad I didn’t just dump him in the trash barrel. I carried him, in “The Scoop,” across the street and laid him in the shady grassy area next to the lake. It’s under a big tree, so maybe the search party will spot him, and their worry can morph into sorrow.

Or maybe the vultures will get to him before then. Fish gotta swim, birds gotta fly, and vultures gotta eat. Circle of life, I suppose, but it still makes me sad. I won’t go so far as to say that this crow’s death is a wake-up call that makes me want to live more fully, more completely, and more presently, as Oprah advises. No, I have cancer to thank for that. But having been through the “cancer journey” myself and having watched my sweet mama go through it, my heart is just a little more tender. Just a teensy bit broken. While joyful about survival and proud of having triumphed, going through such an immense experience produces little fissures, tiny cracks.

Yet, as Harold Duante-Bernardt so poetically pointed out, “We are all broken and wounded in this world. Some choose to grow strong at the broken places.”

So while I keep peeking out the front windows to the shady spot across the street, under the big tree by the lake, watching for a crow family in mourning or a gaggle of hungry vultures, I will resolve to grow stronger at the broken places.

 


16 Comments on “Cruel, cruel world”

  1. David Benbow says:

    Blackbird, fly…Blackbird, fly…Into the light of the dark, black night.

  2. Amy H. says:

    I bet the fireants get to him before the vultures. On another note, you can always freeze the bird in a ziplock until trash day. Works for shrimp peels too when worrying about smelly trash. And I, of all people, don’t want the trash guys to have to deal with smelly trash! I love my garbage men!

    • Only Amy Hoover would suggest — in all seriousness — putting a dead bird in a ziploc and freezing it so as to not offend the trash guys! Love it! That’s part of what makes you so awesome!

  3. Ed says:

    Ouch. I’ve been feeling those cracks and fissures more intensely lately and this sends a jolt right through them. I guess I have no choice but to grow stronger at the broken places. Thank you for sharing and for giving the cr

  4. Ed says:

    Ouch. I’ve been feeling those cracks and fissures more intensely lately and this sends a jolt right through them. I guess I have no choice but to grow stronger at the broken places. Thank you for sharing and for giving the crow a nice final resting spot

  5. Julie says:

    Love you for trying to sensor for me! However, the stubborn streak in me HAS to read when someone tells me not to! It’s the same reason I like the net– nobodies gonna boss me around!
    Anyway, sounds like you had a very interesting day, muppets, birds, body disposal etc
    All in the life of a stay-at-home Mama!
    As Rod says, “you wear it well!”

  6. Julie says:

    “nobody’s ”
    I really need an editor!

  7. Sayre says:

    We get cardinals here that do the window crash on a regular basis. It’s always so sad. I love that you took him over to the lake for his family to find him.

  8. Michelle says:

    Oh dear… you handled that well though. Well better than I would have!!

  9. Amy H. says:

    did anyone else thing the grout was the blood stain? Yes, I know, but that’s where my head went….

  10. Jan Hasak says:

    We can learn so much from nature, can’t we? Broken, we pick up the pieces and move on. It helps to have others to walk the path with us, or limp with us as the case may be. I love that song about Blackbird singing in the dead of night.
    XX Jan


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